attachement to outcomes and goals…is still attachment…

The techniques of the Art of Peace are neither fast nor slow, nor are they inside or outside. They transcend time and space.

-Morihei Ueshiba, The Art of Peace

Detach for all, as silence, stillness and needlessness.

Wanting is attachment. Attachment to an outcome, to a result, to a state of being that is not within our control. Wanting is needing with bite. Wanting is living with tension and desire to have things a specific way, expecting the world to be a certain way, and basing our experience more on the way it should or could be, rather than on the way it is.

Only through detachment from all can true change come, for change through attachment and want, is change that is not natural, but rather contrived, architected, designed. True, long lasting and real change is natural. Like the tree that takes a certain bend because of nature, the wind and flows of the place where it exists, forcing change although possible, is not change that will reflect presence and being.

Detachment is total perception. In detachment for all, there is no desire to change the moment, no need to change the experience, no desire to alter the experience. It is fully experienced, fully sensed, fully perceived and felt deeply.

Detachment from all is fully listening, truly listening, with all senses, with all of my being. Detachment is taking up the ki slack of the universe, sense the ki of all living things, near and far, past and future.

Like when listening to music or another, you are not truly listening if you are talking, verbally or virtually (through your smartphone or other texting device), or talking to yourself in your own thoughts. Words, emanating from yourself in any form, internal or external, indicate that you are not truly listening. Total perception of the moment, including sounds coming from others perceived as structured words, or symbols visually perceived as letters strewed together in logical order – that is “listening”, with total and complete awareness.

Detachment from all is total perception – pure, simple attention of the moment. From that point, anything is possible, everything is free.

A weight settles deep in the pit of your hara when starting to take up ki slack. The space around the shoulders starts to settle, gaps in the inches around the body start to collapse, and an openness in the breath emerges. Parts of the body begin to settle and dissolve quicker than others, and the whole finds harmony, as when one watches the clouds diffuse in the sky.  Some dark clouds take longer than others to disappear, but eventually, one is left but with an open and vast blue sky. Those parts of the body that are still solid reveal something about your state and your balance. Pay attention, not in an attached, “go away will you” state of mind, but rather a “well, would you look at that. I wonder what this is telling me?”

Interesting to notice that when presented as a question, a gentle curiosity emerges, without attachment to the outcome, whereas, the former is attachment, goal oriented, and with tension to boot. Paraphrasing Tohei Sensei, “The one thing o’sensei taught was how to relax – nothing more”.  If a relaxed state is lost, then what is left is tension in the moment, moment to moment, and a feeling of heaviness and “stickiness”.

Our attachment matters much significantly from the inside; attachment to our thoughts, our feelings, our sensations, good to bad, hard to soft, hot to cold. These are always with us, and test us from second to second, hour to hour, year to year, and will be there for as long as breath is present.  Another great challenge, and a battle to welcome, for it is a great foe, are the attachments that the world around us present to us every waking moment.

Pretty things, sexy things, a passing glance, a smile, a frown, a look, an ugly moment, dark places, loud or odd sounds, smells, a hard chair, a cold floor or wind – a good book! Endless are the moments and signals (vibrations of all sorts, at all frequencies) that intersect our senses and our field of awareness. Any and all of these can intersect with our own vibrations, our own natural resonance – and either harmonize with ours for the moment, or attempt to shift our resonance to another frequency. This leads us to loose our center, and rely on external signals and vibrations to define wellness, peace and happiness.  In all of these instances, our ki is taken by the external actor – leading our mind, then our body, our voice, our movement.

When taking up ki slack, our ki is not taken, cannot be taken, preventing our natural resonance from being altered. We then may choose to extend our ki to a moment, an issue or an outcome – but it is by choice, not as the result of it being taken.

When taking up ki slack, the five principles of Aikido then arise.  These five principles at that moment describe the state of coordination of mind, body and spirit. They become not doors, but representations of the result of having harmony of mind body and spirit.  They then are a description, rather than a prescription.

True victory is self victory, right here right now.

Such a victory is the practice of non-attachment, as described above.

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