The stillness never leaves us

“When you fill a room with furniture, where does the space go? When a sound breaks the silence, where does the silence go? When a thought disturbs the stillness of your mind, where does the stillness go?”
– ken mcleod

Emptiness is form, form is emptiness – so often has this phrase been uttered, yet only recently have I begun to integrate it into my practice. As stated by ken mcleod, where does the stillness go? Where does the emptiness go when we fill it with thoughts, emotions, things, events, hopes, desires, fears?

It goes nowhere. It stays, happily present and ubiquitous. We imagine it gone once it is filled. But as with all things, impermanence is the norm, and the only permanent state is emptiness and stillness.

In other words, stillness and emptiness is always there for us. Always. It does not come and go on a whim. It does not appear only in states of deep mediation or serenity. It is always there. We just forget to notice it, we fail to observe it. We choose to fill it. Fill it with sensations, emotions, information, experiences, fill it as we would fill an empty glass with water.

But what of the moment when the glass is filled to the brim, and overflowing. Where does the emptiness and stillness of the void that makes the glass useful go?

“You completely when you rest and do nothing at all. Instead, you follow meticulously and exclusively the cycle of teaching on ignorance, interdependence, and samsara.”
– Jigme Lingpa, The Wisdom Experience of Ever-present Good

The glass remains a glass as long as the void within the glass is recognized and kept in one’s awareness. When the awareness of the stillness and emptiness is replaced by a desire to overfill the glass, to overfill the emptiness and the stillness, then we become not the stillness and the emptiness, but we become that which fills it. We become that which attempts to fill the void, we become attached to that which fills the void.

In our life, so many things can fill the void, fill the stillness and emptiness, fill the silence. Work, drink, the pursuit of knowledge, affection, moments, events, physical items, food, sensations…the options and opportunities as endless. In essence, all of the endless things by which we so frequently define ourselves, and others.

Endless things, but not as endless and infinite as the stillness and emptiness itself. When we become that which fills the emptiness and stillness, we succumb to the illusion that we can fulfill the void, the stillness and emptiness. But there can never can be enough work, enough friends, enough drink or food, enough experiences, enough money the world over that can fill the infinite stillness and emptiness.

As such, from where does stem the desire, the will, the volition to fill the infinite? If our mind can be aware of the fruitlessness of the endeavour, why does our whole essence succumb to the insanity of an unachievable goal?

“…the real notion of victory is not having to deal with an enemy at all.”
– Chögyam Trungpa

Through my experiences on and off the mat, I have come to believe that our suffering stems from our inability to accept, our blindness to, our ignorance of, the emptiness and stillness that is our true nature. We are from the infinite stillness and emptiness. We will return to the infinite stillness and emptiness. We are, at every infinite moment, of the same emptiness and stillness that makes the whole of the universe entire.

It is fear, fear of the nothingness, that pushes us to vainfully fill it. It is the fear that for all that we do and own, we are nothing in the beginning, and we are nothing in the end. It is out fear that in nothing, we are nothing, that we are useless, valueless, insignificant, empty.

Fear, denial, rejection, avoidance, of the emptiness, stillness and silence within, is our biggest battle, our ultimate conflict, our spiritual war.

On the mat, whenever the emptiness and stillness is ignored, replaced by the volition of mind and tension of the body, the result is a failure to blend and find harmony with all. At that moment, harmony of mind, body and spirit is substituted by mental prowess, physical expressions of strengths, or spiritual arrogance.

O’sensei taught that Budo is Love. Not love in the amorous way, defined by emotions and states of bliss. Budo as Love is Love of the emptiness and stillness in ourselves, and in others. Love of the infinite stillness and emptiness, the infinite silence that is the universe and all that is within it. Love of the absolute truth revealed when we accept that we are from nothingness, and will return to nothingness.

Budo is Love, Love of the infinite stillness, silence and emptiness that is within us, and in all. Such a Love becomes your sword, your spiritual weapon to confront fears and desires leading to the mindless volition to disrupt the stillness, to overfill the emptiness, to drown out the silence.

In the moment that the sword is drawn, the enemy is silenced, and detachment from all will occur. A relaxation will emerge, deep from within. A feeling of profound balance and harmony will surface. A wholeness will become apparent, and we will become one with the infinite stillness, silenced and nothingness of the universe.

Harmony of mind, body and spirit manifest. The Ki of the universe will makes itself known, for the eternal Ki lies within the stillness, the silence, the emptiness of the universe. Only when we become one with the infinite stillness can we enter into balance with the Ki of the universe.

At that moment, Ki will come into us, and Ki will flow from us, not clinging to us, not building up or stagnating around us, but freely flowing, from near and far, timeless, endless, boundless.

In such a moment, the fear of the emptiness, the stillness and the silence will, like a lifting fog, dissipate, revealing an open and endless sky, within which you will find true peace, equanimity and Love.

“When your mind is trained in self-discipline, even if you are surrounded by hostile forces, your peace of mind will hardly be disturbed. On the other hand, your mental peace and calm can easily be disrupted by your own negative thoughts and emotions. The real enemy is within, not outside.”

– The Dalai Lama, “The Enemy Within”

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