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Buddhism and Aikido…blended

“Shugyō is a tricky word to define. At a basic level, it is a mental and physical discipline one undertakes for the sake of self-cultivation”
– Jk mann

Self-cultivation. Is there really any other reason to practice? Not self-improvement. Self-cultivation, the practice of simply being, and growing, is like when we cultivate crops, cultivate students, cultivate relationships, cultivate patience.

On the mat, a sense of calmness and flow occurs when we practice with the intent of self-cultivation. This is because there is no goal in cultivation – only being. Being with the growth that is intrinsic, and not extrinsic. Being with the moment that is pure and present, for all growth and cultivation goes through the present. Being, not doing.

You can’t do cultivation, you are cultivation. It is in the patience and awareness of simple being, simple, endless change, that manifests shugyō.

Shugyō is non-attachement, keeping one point at the hara, flowing ki, relaxed with our body weigh fully extended in all directions, an infinite awareness temporally as well as spatially.

Shugyō is without desire, without fear, without greed or expectation. It is the infinite awareness.

“With interest and investigation there’s wisdom. Effort alone, without wisdom—the way people generally understand it—is associated with strained activity because it is usually motivated by greed, aversion, and delusion. Effort with wisdom is a healthy desire to know and understand whatever arises, without any preference for the outcome.”
– Sayadaw U Tejaniya, “The Wise Invesigator”

Shugyō cares not for the outcome, for we are what we are. Shugyō is effortless for it is what we essentially are, once the fullest of illusions is subsumed. Shugyō is infinite for all is emptiness – all is infinite.

Shugyō is not learnt, for it is present. Shugyō is not mastered, for we already master our own spirit, when expressed.

Shugyō is silence.

Shugyō is pure presence, basking within the flow of ki ofthe universe.

Shugyō is just being.

Practice on and off the mat accordingly.

“Awareness cannot be taught. Awareness simply throws light on what is, without any separation whatsoever. Activity does not destroy it and sitting does not create it.

It is there, uncreated, freely functioning in wisdom and love, when self-centered conditioning is clearly revealed, in the light of understanding.

When the changing states of body-mind are simply left to themselves without any choice or judgment, a new quietness emerges by itself.

This new mind that is no-mind is free of duality—there is no doer in it and nothing to be done.”

~Toni Packer

“Perhaps the most important thing we bring to another person is the silence in us, not the sort of silence that is filled with unspoken criticism or hard withdrawal. The sort of silence that is a place of refuge, of rest, of acceptance of someone as they are. We are all hungry for this other silence. It is hard to find. In its presence we can remember something beyond the moment, a strength on which to build a life. Silence is a place of great power and healing.”

~ Rachel Naomi Remen

Upon the mat, as well as any other moment of the day, silence is always with us. Much of our world, however, seeks to interrupt our silence, fill our silence with sights, sounds, sensations – noise as I sometimes like to call it. Our world is sensations, sensations which are cast upon the silence that is our true essence.

Recently, I have found my meditation practice shifting to simply being in the silence, and listening, deeply. Listening for the thoughts that come and go. Listening to the sounds that traverse the neighborhood at the earliest hours of the morning. Listening to the cravings that speak to desires and wishes past and future. Listening to the mind who often seeks to convince that thoughts are silence.

Nothing other than sitting – silently – is required to being in the world – the focus being the word “being”.

“All of humanity’s problems stem from man’s inability to sit quietly in a room alone.”
Blaise Pascal

Being is not popular in a world where we are unfortunately often measured, loved or hated, liked or disliked, by what we do or not do, what we own or not own (as a result of what we do), what we say or don’t say, what actions we take or not take.

But rarely are we simply accepted, simply respected, simply loved, for just being. In just being is the silence, the space, the essence that is pure love. Not the love associated with things, events, or other external objects. Love associated with the acceptance and respect of the essential essence that resides in all beings – the silence – where the soul and spirit calls home.

But are we not “doing” when we are “doing nothing”? Are we practicing non-silence when doing? In the moment of pure silence, whatever we “do” is non-doing, for we are not attached to the “doing”. We simply do, detached from the past memories and future dreams, in the silence that is eternal.

I think this state is what was meant in part when some speak of “when you walk, just walk. when you eat, just eat, when you….”. You get the idea.

In pure silence, we do what we are called to do, not because of what it may bring, what it may resolve from past errors, what it might gain us, but because it is what we are called to do – simply.

So sit, quietly, and practice listening to the silence. Doing will then become simply doing.

My father taught me that we are what we do, not what we say.

~ David Suzuki

…a meditation on wei wu wei…action without action…

“delusion (or error) means to take as real what is not real and to take as unreal what is real. Leaving delusion behind is synonymous with overcoming the four demonic obsessions (the four maras): obsession with mortality, obsession with physical existence, obsession with power and control, and obsession with emotional reactions.”

~ Ken McLeod

Action without action

Will manifest

When effort is effortless

When motion is motionless

When focus is without focus

When desire is without desire

When we resonate with the eternal silence of the universe

When ki flows eternal to us

And flows eternal away from us

When duality fades

And our mind and body

Blends effortlessly

With our spirit eternal

“It is easy to have calmness in inactivity, it is hard to have calmness in activity, but calmness in activity is true calmness.”

~ Suzuki

Practice and being is not about control
It is about surrender
Surrender of the concept
That we control our world
And those around us

Practice and being is about katsu
It is as O’Sensei spike
About self victory
Surrendering the concepts
Of ever controlling the external
And becoming fully aware
And mindful
As the stoics spoke as well

The warriors battle is with the self
The world is your mat
Every moment is your mat
For your training and your practice
To control the self

True victory
On the mat that is the world
Is self victory

When you talk, say not a word
A white flower grows in the quiet. Let your tongue become that flower.

—Rumi (1207-1273)”

In 2006, I traveled to Seoul, South Korea for a business trip. At that point in my life, I had studied Buddhism for the better part of 8 or 9 years. For some reason, the proximity to the far east, likely combined with jet lag, led me to the most oriental of rituals – a Starbucks in downtown Seoul.

Over a latte or venti bold…it’s been too long to remember…I sat down and told myself that I would not rise from the seat I was sitting in until I produced a triad – a summary, in three verses, of what Buddhism had taught me up to that point. It was a point where I needed to summarize for me what Buddhism brought into my life, in simple and condensed thoughts.

Then, without much effort, the following verses came to me as an instruction of how to practice at every infinite moment:

Be silentwork triad

in thought

in speech

Be still

in glance

in movement

Be without need

in heart

in mind

I sat, stunned at the simplicity of the words, and the truth that they spoke to me. I looked out at the window, throngs of Koreans walking by, and was struck by the non-nondescript place and context within which such words came about. I also envisioned that they would come when visiting a major temple or shrine – never a Starbucks in a busy Seoul business district.

So what of these simple thoughts? I still study them often, and return to them in moments of difficulty on or off the mat. Many interpretations and ideas have I attributed to them, some in an attempt to over-analyze, others in an attempt to convince myself that these thoughts are filled with flaws. At this moment, I take them as follows.

Be still, in movement, is for me movement without movement. Movement required, no more. Movement with grace and peace. Be still, in glance, is to look at the world in a quiet, serene way. Not shifting, nervous eyes, but the eyes that come with coordination of mind, body and spirit – gentle eyes. In essence, stillness of the eternal nothingness.

Be silent, in thought, is the quieting of the mind, the chatter, the clutter that is our modern mind.  Be silent, in words, is to speak only when words are needed, and even then, with few words, reflecting patience, serenity and peace. Both are not to be interpreted as silencing all thoughts and words, but in seeing the thoughts and words against the silence of the eternal emptiness.

Be without need, in mind, is the quieting of desire, of craving, of neediness. In our consumerist society, our craving mind is a calculating foe – practice expends much in addressing this adversary. Be without need, in heart, is the quieting of desire, of craving, of neediness that is rooted beneath the mind, deep within our emotions and heart. Being without need, in heart, is not being heartless, but in being with unbounded love, for we can give, and fully expect nothing in return.

And so these words have been an inspiration and guidance for me over the years. I have two calligraphies that remind me of these words that uttered from my years of practice. One is home, the other at work. I often explain to those who ask what the calligraphy represents, and I try to explain. Often, gracious acknowledgement is given. Frequently, discomfort from some who seem to be surprised by the personal nature of the message.

Home triad

For me, the message is universal. Although it was the product of study, I consider it nothing more than the product of my understanding and decision to summarize my studies in a way that could be easily remembered, understood, and shared.

And my guideposts for when moments are fleeting or challenging my practice. I’ve come to accept that if only these three practices are sustained – silence, stillness, needlessness – practice will forever be rich and engaging.

Neither the past

Nor the future

Can injure or harm us

Only the present

And if our mind

Is unable to manage only that

Then we are truly without peace

 

– Dan, 2007

 

“What is your automatic reflex to life situations, especially difficult ones? Do you think about yourself and how you might profit or escape from a situation? Or do you think about others and how you can help? Progress on the path, and a sign that you’re well prepared for death, occurs when the former changes into the latter, when you default not into selfishness but into selflessness.”

– Andrew Holecek

I have to start by admitting it. Addiction has been part of my life…well, for a good part of it. My “hungry ghost”[1] has found a home in school work, cycling, exercise, professional work, hobbies, reading, and the occasional 20-year-old scotch or pint of Guinness. I’ve come to accept that the “hungry ghost” is not just a visitor, but as much a part of me as my shadow.  Well, it has been simpler many days to just call it my shadow, à la Jung.

Addiction, I’ve come to believe, is more common than most would admit, based on my observation of attachment and lack of self-control when it comes to matters of work, drink, internet usage, TV watching – in short, mostly anything and everything external to our selves. Think of something external to yourself, and you can likely find an addict online somewhere – or maybe even a 12-step group.

So what is one to do with such a ubiquitous, insidious shadow among our midst? Ignorance and succumbing to the urge is always an option – and the one many unfortunately choose. Easy to choose when the villain is work or other socially acceptable forms – such as drink, popular media or food, for example. Not so easy when it transitions into the less socially acceptable, such as more drink, other intoxicants, false relationships, or worse.

Other alternatives to ignorance and succumbing may include 12 step programs, treatment, retreats, or other external modalities that seek to alter our weakness to the affliction in question. For some, this has served well, for others, a rotating door of trying and trying again.

Over the past few months, I have come to conclude that external modes of treatment are as much at risk of becoming a crutch as the crutch itself. This is not to critique or undermine the validity of such approaches – it is my observation that external modalities have become the home of the “hungry ghost” in many instances.

These observations brought me to the assumption that if external treatment risks becoming the target of our “hungry ghost”, then an internal treatment could be an option. This is when I blended my thoughts about addiction with the many lessons from the aikido mat, and the classical teaching of O’Sensei in “masakatsu agatsu, katsu ayame” – true victory is self-victory, right here right now.

If true victory is self-victory, would this not make the  “hungry ghost” the assailant, the uke, in terms of living with an addiction? The “hungry ghost” as a uke assailing one’s spirit, mind and body, living and thriving at the expense of a harmonious self, could become an internal practice worth considering.

“When I think of the Buddhist precepts, which are ethical precepts, they are all about relationships. I’ve boiled them down to one: vowing to live in a way that is not at the expense of other beings. In a sense it’s very grand and impossible, but it’s also a really powerful motivation.”

– Alan Senauke

So…what would meeting and defending one’s self against the “hungry ghost” uke be like?

Well, it would start as does any confrontation – with a bow.  All assailants, internal and external, deserve respect, for they are our teachers on the path to self.  When the hungry ghosts rears it head, observe it, notice it arising, do not react to its presence – for it is familiar, even if not welcomed.

As with all Uke, immediately take up ki slack from the universe. Either through one of the five principles (keep one point, relax completely, extend ki, keep weight underside, or detach from all), or by allowing ki to flow from the universe into all of you, taking up ki slack will establish the conditions and state for an eventual attack, if Uke wishes to escalate it. With taking up ki slack, Uke is already being taken off-balance.

With taking up ki slack, a state of total, deep relaxation occurs. Not relaxation that makes one mellow and inattentive. Rather, a relaxation that makes one fully attentive, fully aware, fully active in all senses. In such a state, Uke cannot detect any signs of aggression or defence – no evident reaction, even subtle.  Uke may be concerned by such lack of reaction, or may misinterpret it as Nage being oblivious to the threat at hand.
Uke then chooses to strike. The strike can be slow and calculated; it can be fast and aggressive. Blend. Sense Uke’s intent and energy. With the hungry ghost Uke, the energy is visceral, subtle, can be all encompassing.  Be aware of and feel Uke’s ki – a ki, which is familiar, for it is your own.  In such an instance, Uke is especially dangerous, for his ki is your ki – and your ki is his ki. Confusion can ensue.  Maintain coordination, harmony of mind, body and spirit – and feel Uke’s intent, Uke’s ki.

Execute the technique that best serves the moment. Visualize Uke being subjected to the technique. Execute it slowly – don’t rush. Uke is strong and deliberate – and knows you well. Pin Uke, or choose to throw him. Either one will do – but trust your visualization to guide you. Feel Uke’s energy and sense how weakened, frustrated or agitated he may be as a result. Irrespective of Uke’s state, maintain harmony of mind, body and spirit. Uke will strive to disrupt such harmony – for victory is found in such loss of balance and centering.

If at any moment you grasp to strongly, fail to maintain harmony of mind, body and spirit, become attached to Uke’s movement or intent, become physically detached, or fall as a result of Uke’s efforts, remember to perform ukemi.  Protect yourself in the fall, then return to harmony of mind, body and spirit. Return quickly. Return deeply.  The hungry ghost Uke is a shrewd adversary – defeat is always a risk. But the more harmony is cultivated, practiced and maintained, the less likely Uke will get the upper hand.

At one point, possibly after one attack, possibly after an endless number of attacks, Uke will learn to recognize that today, victory is not within grasp.  Uke may choose to return another day – this has been my experience of late – bent on further attempting to defeat and challenge the moment. Uke may choose to alter his tactics – a sound strategy given Uke’s intimate knowledge of Nage.  In all instances, harmony of mind, body and spirit must be called upon to respond to any such changes in approach.

In all such instances, remember to bow upon Uke’s arrival – and upon his departure, thanking him for the lessons and growth that he brings to your practice.

Eventually, after many battles and confrontations, the hungry ghost Uke may come to accept that victory is not within grasp.  Although I have yet to see such a day (although I remain optimistic that it is a matter of time and practice), I believe that at such a moment, Uke will surrender his weapon and simply step into nothingness. I envision the moment being one where Uke ceases to extend ki, or manipulate ki – and become emptiness – allowing ki to flow freely and effortlessly.

At such a moment, a final bow will be given to the hungry ghost Uke, and words of gratitude uttered to thank him for a journey of growth. All past and future will cease, and the pure present will manifest.

Throughout the conflict, remember to love the hungry ghost Uke, for he has lost the moment he expresses aggression.  Accept Uke, for his presence and the challenge he presents is practice in its highest form.

As O’Sensei was often heard encouraging – protect the attacker, protect Uke. The Art of peace is not one that seeks to destroy Uke, but to blend and enable a path to peace.  This is especially true with the hungry ghost Uke – one who’s making is intimately known – for it is us.

The addiction Uke, the hungry ghost Uke, is most likely one of your greatest teachers. Welcome him. Bow. Respect him. And practice, practice, practice in his presence.

The eventual harmony with one’s shadow, through love as O’Sensei had expressed, becomes true victory, self-victory.

“The problem with interpersonal love is that you are dependent on the other person to reflect love back to you. That’s part of the illusion of separateness. The reality is that love is a state of being that comes from within.”

– Ram Dass

[1]: the hungry ghost realm is often referenced when speaking about addiction. A great work whose title was inspired by this point is Dr Gabor Mate’s “In the realm of hungry ghosts“. It is highly recommended.

“Any notion of time takes you out of presence.”
– Ken McLeod, An Arrow to the Heart

The past cast with one’s flesh
Memories and recollections echo
Images and sounds, shadows and light
Etched in emptiness

The future painted with one’s mind
Desire and curiosity create
Wind and currents, space and time
Projected into nothingness

The present manifested with one’s soul
Impermanence and change resides
Infinite space, timeless breath
Forever fleeting

The infinite point from one’s harmony
Endless and eternal light
Flowing waves, dark torrents
Comes to know without knowing

“One must be deaf to the conceptual articulations and rely on the indefinable experience of knowing itself”.
~Ken McLeod

Art distills sensations and embodies it with enhanced meaning.

~ Miguel de Unamuno

reflections from a recent meditation session…

a feeling of pressure and entrainment carries me on an almost unconscious level. like being in a running river, life jacket well cliped on, but being entrained nonetheless. it is a feeling, a physical feeling.

sensations in the body can be the root of our actions, our behaviors, our feelings. what if the sensations were so pervasive, and so interlinked with our thinking patterns that we had created an endless closed loop?  like gravity, you cannot know the feeling of not having it unless you go out of your way to eliminate it, or happen to experience by accident, the absence of it, if even for one moment. no amount of reading, re reading and research can substitute for the experience itself – experience, fully lived, can shift ones thinking – ones view of the moment. mindset is not changed by lectures and words – although they have served the purpose in some instances – but by experiences that shift the sensations in the body even for a second.

so how to know what of my thinking creates the sensations of being in a rushing river? when sitting, the imagined fear creates the same sensations as the real fear, acute, localized and real sensations.

“Do not look upon this world with fear and loathing. Bravely face whatever the gods offer.”

~ Morihei Ueshiba

but what if the overall sensations were so pervasive, ubiquitous and transparent that we don’t even realize or are aware that they are the result of our thinking? not the result of real experiences – the result of our thinking!

thinking that is not only conscious – but more insidious, our unconscious thinking!! those scripts that run in the background that keep the conscious scripts running. if sitting reveals the effect that our conscious thinking can have on our physical sensations, can sitting reveal our unconscious scripts and thoughts?

if sitting seeks to tune into the vibrations at all levels, then only through deep listening can the unconscious script be observed, and maybe even heard.

listen, deeply, and follow where the mind flows. the conscious can be swayed by the unconscious, but the unconscious cannot sway ki. ki leads all – conscious through the unconscious.

ki, coming, going or sitting still for a moment, leads the mind (conscious, through the unconscious), which leads the body (sensations, movement, speech, glance and attention).  if the mind, both conscious and unconscious, overtake the moment, ki can be taken, directed externally and lead the body.

if your spirit – the realm of ki – is immature, or undertrained, having succumbed to the mind’s power and strength, then our ki is at risk to being taken and moved. our mind is a vicious adversary, one that will never hesitate to grab the upper hand at any time.

In extreme situations, the entire universe becomes our foe; at such critical times, unity of mind and technique is essential – do not let your heart waver!

~ Morihei Ueshiba

training the spirit to give, take and hold ki, will prevent it from being taken by anything, anyone, or any moment. even the mind then becomes no different than any other antagonist – one to be watched, observed, listened and gently asked to play the role it plays – not one of spirit, but one of mind – the master of the body and its biological functions.

watch your mind, conscious and unconscious, always attempting to control ki through taking, sending or holding it.

in some instances, the mind can mimic or even pretend to be the spirit. do not fall spell to this trick. you will know that the mind is mimicking the spirit by the quality of the body. the mind cannot mimic the spirit without the body being engaged. the body will show signs of engagement, of attachment, and will prevent ki from flowing as a result of the background tension that resides. when the spirit is truly present, the five principles manifest, for coordination of mind body and spirit has manifested.

your own mind is your deadliest enemy. your body is the mind’s accomplice. your spirit, with ki as the currency, is truth and life. train the spirit, and ki will be tamed. tame ki, and the mind will no longer be autonomous in its decisions and actions. tame the mind, and the body and its many manifestations as inputs and outputs – manifestations from the mind (movement, glance, listening, touching, speaking and thoughts) – and manifestations from outside (sounds, light, sensations, thoughts, taste and smells) become just that – manifestations.

Always keep your mind as bright and clear as the vast sky, the great ocean, and the highest peak, empty of all thoughts. Always keep your body filled with light and heat. Fill yourself with the power of wisdom and enlightenment.
~ Morihei Ueshiba

“Our hold on the things we cherish is like our grasping the blade of a knife; the tighter we grasp, the more pain and damage when it is pulled from our hand.”

When Buddhists Attack – J.K. Mann

Attachment. The one thing we can count on. Like the sun and the wind – always there. Always ready to act. Attachment is the one constant most of us can speak to with some experience. Anyone who claims having found how not to be attached is very likely attached to ego – or has truly reached enlightenment – at which point they would not likely claim it as such.

Attachment is ubiquitous. Attachment to work, and the belief that success and wealth will bring happiness. Attachment to health, and the hope that prolonged life will bring moments yet to be experienced. Attachment to power, and the desire to control what can never be controlled. Attachment to fear, and the worry that issues and events will destroy our plans. Attachment to words and the false wisdom that owning and speaking words often falsely portrays.

Attachment to desire, and the craving that leads us to seek externally what can only be discovered from a journey within.  We are born into desire, desire for life – but not into attachment and tension. Attachment and tension arise from wanting, from craving, from desire beyond a desire for life. From wanting more than giving.

We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.

~ T. S. Eliot

Over time, we grasp and hold so strongly to things, to people, to moments, to memories – that we choke the very life out of the life which surrounds us. We grasp through craving. We grasp through wanting. We grasp through endless desire. We grasp through a vicious circle of grasping for the sake of grasping, for we are taught and observe in others the fruits of grasping – the spoils of craving – and the belief that more is better.

At one moment, all that grasping and wanting fails – and we fall. And when we fall, we choose. We either fall into fear and anger, and choose to re-emerge stronger, hungrier. Most who fall choose this path, for it is expected by society.

Alternatively, fall into a bottomless well of wonder, unknown – but relieving. A relief from years of grasping, for there is nothing to grasp as we fall. We enjoy the fall and the relaxed feeling of knowing that grasping would only harm our hands and get in the way of enjoying the journey. Observe the fall. Notice the sensations of the fall. Enjoy the peace that comes from flowing and being fully present in pure perception.

At one moment, the pain and grief that comes from grasping becomes as clear as a blue sky – we have grasped without conscious thought. We have programmed ourselves to grasp, want and crave.  We have been tense and tight due to the many years where we thought that holding onto something – or someone – would keep them from leaving, changing, ending.

At that moment, we discover death arising from our own grasping, craving and desires. Death of moments of beauty. Death of friendships. Death of honest work. Death of our own health. Death of life itself.

In relaxation lies life. In detachment lies flow. In releasing tension lies peace.

“The only thing that Ueshiba Sensei taught of true value was how to relax”
~
Koichi Tohei

“Address the imbalance without grasping for an outcome”
– Ken McLeod

During a recent meditation sitting, I was struck by the persistence of the grasping mind, the grasping heart and the grasping body. At no time did the three subside, each trading off each other the duty of disrupting the silence and the emptiness of the pure moment. At some moments, all three collaborated to take the flank and attempt a full frontal attack. The issue with the experience was not the incessant attacks – we are bombarded daily, hourly, presently, by incessant assailants – it was the quality of the attack, the texture of the attack, the vibration of the attack.

Stickiness. Grasping stickiness.

I don’t know of a better way to describe the quality that the three assailants expressed. They each had a grasping stickiness to them, as if they were motivated by desire and a wanting to be connected, stuck, glued, to the pure moment. In doing so, they would inevitably prevent the pure moment of perception from occuring, prevent zanshing from manifesting.

“Some of us think holding on makes us strong, but sometimes it is letting go.”
— Herman Hesse

Attachment. Attachment is another way to describe it. Each of the three assailants had a quality, a texture of attachment, a stickiness like when you get used gum stuck between your fingers – a sticky, stretchy texture which does not easily let go, and the more you scrub and try to detach from it, the more it gums up, and becomes even stickier.

The more I attempted to pry them away, the stickier they became, the more incessant they were in attaching.

So I stopped grasping. I stopped being sticky in return. I stopped being attached to the assailants who had a desire to be attached to me.

I stopped. Simply stopped. Simple, yes. Easy, no.

At that moment, wonderfully unexpected sensations manifested. Connection. Wholesome, deep, simple connection.

I observed a connection with the mind which ceased to judge, expect, or demand it to be or do more than the mind can be or do.

I observed a connection with the heart which ceased to fear the emotions, the comfort, the security, which the heart is sometimes unable to recognize or accept.

I observed a connection with the body which revealed the body as it was, revealed its strengths and weaknesses, and revealed the impermanent, almost temporary, nature of the balance which is a healthy body.

With such simply elegant connections, rather than grasping attachment, stickiness, wanting – a surprisingly pleasing discovery.

Acceptance. Acceptance of connection over attachment. Revelation of connections, large and small, far and wide, past and future. Connections without desire, without stickiness, without wanting, without grasping. Connections without attachment.

Is this maybe a description, an interpretation of what Sensei Bussell terms “detach from all”?

Detaching from all, non-attachment, does not mean no connection. Quite the opposite, it means full, unbridled connection, mental, spiritual, emotional and spiritual.

In Aikido, coordination, harmony of our mind, body and spirit is harmony which maintains, expands and enriches our connection in every moment – without stickness, without grasping, without attachment. On the mat, magic, true magic, occurs when such attachement-free connections manifest, and ki, the essence of the universe, flows freely.

Become increasingly mindful of sticky, attachment-laden connections, at the mental, emotional, physical or spiritual level. Chose no connection over connections with attachment.

Practice detaching from all. Practice connecting without attachment.

Practice. Always.

“Ki flows to where it is needed in your life the way water flows downhill. Ki doesn’t live in memories or anticipation…”
-R. Moon